Olympia, WA

Olympia, WA Mobile Veterinarians are listed on this page

Mobile veterinarians throughout the Olympia, Washington area offer an extremely valuable service to all pet owners. Olympia mobile veterinarians help keep animals healthy and living long, happy lives. Whether it’s a household pet or exotic animal, mobile vets offer regular check-ups and standard vet services such as exams and vaccinations. They also offer more urgent care in the event of emergency or illness.

Map of Olympia WA Mobile Veterinarians

Local Mobile Veterinarians in Olympia, WA

Healthy Pets Animal Hospital
Veterinarian
Olympia, WA, United States
1 360-943-8900

North Olympia Animal Hospital
Veterinarian
Olympia, WA, United States
+1 360-456-6006

TLC Veterinary Clinic
Veterinarian
Olympia, WA, United States
+1 360-786-1942

West Olympia Pet Hospital
Veterinarian
Olympia, WA, United States
+1 360-352-4414

See the Google Maps listing here

Mobile Veterinarians near me in Everett, WA

Mobile Veterinarians near me in Kent, WA

Mobile Veterinarians near me in Seattle, WA

Mobile Veterinarians near me in Spokane, WA

Mobile Veterinarians near me in Tacoma, WA

Mobile Veterinarians near me in Vancouver, WA

Mobile Veterinarians in the Olympia, WA area

Mobile veterinary services in Olympia, Washington for dogs and cats may be best known for providing low-cost spay and neuter services as well as basic medical care, like those deployed by the ASPCA in under served communities in the United States. Some private practice veterinarians also make house calls to provide treatment as well as end-of-life services for pets.

Anyone who has ever transported a panicked cat or dog to their veterinarian’s office, however, knows that having a vet in the Olympia, WA area, come to them could save a lot of anxiety for all parties including the pet. That’s why more small animal veterinarians around the country are hitting the road to treat cats, dogs, “pocket pets” (such as hamsters and guinea pigs) and the occasional resident of a farm or petting zoo in the comfort of the animals’ own homes in Olympia, Washington.

In the next year, Mobile Veterinarians Near Me Search Directory will be posting regular blogs about the best mobile veterinarians in the area and why we recommend them. You’ll notice these posts will focus on Olympia, Washington mobile veterinarians. This is important to anyone searching for treatment for their pet and wants to educate themselves as much as possible. This tool is for seeing the top rated mobile vets so you can learn about them, compare reviews, and get an idea of pricing.

To find a Olympia mobile vet that is a good match for you and your pet, go through the listings below. You will be able to find the vet’s name and from there, you can compare service offerings, prices, and reviews. You can also contact them and talk to them directly.

Olympia Washington Mobile Veterinarians

Olympia, the capital of Washington state, is at the southern end of Puget Sound. The sprawling Washington State Capitol Campus, beside Capitol Lake, includes the stately Legislative Building and the 1909 Governor’s Mansion. On the downtown waterfront, Percival Landing Park has a boardwalk and public art. More than 200 bird species visit the estuary habitat of the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge.

Welcome to Olympia, Washington

Mobile Veterinarians Near Me in Olympia, WAWith an economic engine fueled to a great extent by state government, Olympia enjoys the benefits of a stable work force, engaged and educated community, and well-supported school system. Historic downtown Olympia offers a variety of eclectic shopping and dining experiences, while Olympia’s westside is a regional shopping destination at numerous national brand stores and the auto mall. Mild winters and pleasantly warm summers make the Olympia area an ideal place for outdoor recreation. In Olympia, you can “get out of town” without even leaving the city. Olympia maintains 40 public parks for your recreation enjoyment. Public trails lead to saltwater beaches where native tribes once met for potlatches through woods thick with big-leaf maples and towering Douglas firs. Salmon return to Budd Inlet each fall and run the ladder under the 5th Avenue Bridge.

Olympia’s strategic geographic location along Interstate 5 at the gateway to the Olympic Peninsula, puts one within two hours or less of regional recreational attractions – from hiking and skiing in the mountains to beach combing along ocean shores.

The site of Olympia has been home to Lushootseed-speaking peoples known as the Steh-Chass (or Stehchass; who became part of the post-treaty Squaxin Island Tribe) for thousands of years. Other Native Americans regularly visited the head of Budd Inlet and the Steh-Chass including the other ancestor tribes of the Squaxin, as well as the Nisqually, Puyallup, Chehalis, Suquamish, and Duwamish. The first recorded Europeans came to Olympia in 1792. Peter Puget and a crew from the British Vancouver Expedition are said to have explored the site, but neither recorded any encounters with the resident Indigenous population here. In 1846, Edmund Sylvester and Levi Smith jointly claimed the land that now comprises downtown Olympia. In 1851, the U.S. Congress established the Customs District of Puget Sound for Washington Territory and Olympia became the home of the customs house. Its population steadily expanded from Oregon Trail immigrants. In 1850, the town settled on the name Olympia, at the suggestion of local resident Colonel Isaac N. Ebey,due to its view of the Olympic Mountains to the Northwest. The area began to be served by a small fleet of steamboats known as the Puget Sound Mosquito Fleet.

Over the course of two days, December 24–26, 1854, Governor Isaac I. Stevens negotiated the Treaty of Medicine Creek with the representatives of the Nisqually, Puyallup, Squawksin, Steh’Chass, Noo-Seh-Chatl, Squi-Aitl, T’Peeksin, Sah-Heh-Wa-Mish, and S’Hotl-Ma-Mish tribes. Stevens’ treaty included the preservation of Indigenous fishing, hunting, gathering and other rights. It also included a section which, at least as interpreted by United States officials, required the Native American signatories to move to one of three reservations. Doing so would effectively force the Nisqually people to cede their prime farming and living space. One of the leaders of the Nisqually, Chief Leschi, outraged, refused to give up ownership of this land and instead fought for his peoples’ right to their territory, sparking the beginning of the Puget Sound War. The war ended in the controversial execution of Leschi.

In 1896, Olympia became the home of the Olympia Brewing Company, which brewed Olympia Beer until 2003.

Need another City or State?

Home