Paterson, NJ

Paterson NJ Mobile Veterinarians are listed at this page

Mobile veterinarians throughout the Paterson, NJ area offers extremely valuable service to all pet owners. Paterson mobile veterinarians help keep animals healthy and living long, happy lives. Whether it’s a household pet or exotic animal, mobile vets offer regular check ups and standard vet services such as exams and vaccinations. They also offer more urgent care in the event of emergency or illness.

Map of Paterson NJ Mobile Veterinarians

Local Mobile Veterinarians in Paterson, NJ

Got Pets Mobile Vet
Veterinarian
+1 201-312-0418

Ridgewood Mobile Veterinarian
Veterinarian
+1 201-972-5054

Mobile Vet Oakland
Veterinarian · 84 Pawnee Ave
+1 800-481-0109

Cloverleaf Mobile Veterinary Services ~ Eryn Taormina, DVM~
Veterinarian · 9 Cannonball Rd
+1 862-248-3778

Metropolitan Mobile Vet
Veterinarian
+1 917-484-0686

See the Google Maps listing here

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Mobile Veterinarians in the Paterson, NJ area

To find a Paterson mobile vet that is a good match for you and your pet, go through the listings below. You will be able to find the vet’s name and from there, you can compare service offerings, prices, and reviews. You can also contact them and talk to them directly.

Mobile Veterinarians Near Me in Paterson, NJ

Paterson, New Jersey lies within the New York City metropolitan area. This diverse, densely settled city is known as “Silk City” for its historic role in silk production during the late nineteenth century. As of the United States 2000 Census, the city population was 149,222. Census population projections indicate a population of 148,708 as of 2006, making it New Jersey’s third largest city. It is the county seat of Passaic County. Paterson is known as the “Silk City” for its dominant role in silk production during the later 19th century.

Mobile veterinary services in Paterson, NJ for dogs and cats may be best known for providing low-cost spay and neuter services as well as basic medical care, like those deployed by the ASPCA in under served communities in the United States. Some private practice veterinarians also make house calls to provide treatment as well as end-of-life services for pets.

Anyone who has ever transported a panicked cat or dog to their veterinarian’s office, however, knows that having a vet in the Paterson, NJ area, come to them could save a lot of anxiety for all parties including the pet. That’s why more small animal veterinarians around the country are hitting the road to treat cats, dogs, “pocket pets” (such as hamsters and guinea pigs) and the occasional resident of a farm or petting zoo in the comfort of the animals’ own homes in Paterson, NJ.

Paterson was originally formed as a township from portions of Acquackanonk Township on April 11, 1831, while the area was still part of Essex County. Paterson became part of the newly-created Passaic County on February 7, 1837. Paterson was incorporated as a city on April 14, 1851, based on the results of a referendum held that day.

The industries developed in Paterson were powered by the 77-foot-high Great Falls and a system of water raceways that harnessed the power of the falls, providing power for the mills in the area until 1914 and fostering the growth of the city around the mills. The district originally included dozens of mill buildings and other manufacturing structures associated with the textile industry and, later, the firearms, silk and railroad locomotive manufacturing industries. In the latter half of the 19th century silk production became the dominant industry and formed the basis of Paterson’s most prosperous period, earning it the nickname “Silk City.” In 1835 Samuel Colt began producing firearms in Paterson, although within a few years he moved his business to Hartford, Connecticut. Later in the 19th century Paterson was the site of early experiments with submarines by Irish-American inventor John Philip Holland. Two of Holland’s early models — one found at the bottom of the Passaic River — are on display in the Paterson Museum, housed in the former Rogers Locomotive and Machine Works near the Passaic Falls.

The city was a mecca for immigrant laborers who worked in its factories, particularly Italian weavers from the Naples region. Paterson was the site of historic labor unrest that focused on anti-child labor legislation, and the six-month-long Paterson silk strike of 1913 that demanded the eight-hour day and better working conditions. It was defeated by the employers, with workers forced to return under pre-strike conditions. Factory workers labored long hours for low wages under dangerous conditions and lived in crowded tenement buildings around the mills. The factories then moved to the South, where there were no labor unions, and still later moved overseas.

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