New Products for Spot

The post New Products for Spot by Melissa L. Kauffman appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Bed:

Sherruff Pug Reversible Round Bed (X-S and S), $39.99-$47.99. petique.com

 

Gear:

Wolfgang Man & Beast WildFlower Leash, Comfort Dog Harness and Collar. $17.95/ collar, $19.95 leash, $29.95/harness. wolfgangusa.com

Body Care:

Metro Paws Charcoal Peppermint Metro Wipes. $16.99 and $8.99/25-count travel size. metropaws.com

Grain-Free Food:

Merrick Slow-Cooked BBQ Recipes. $38.28/case of 12. chewy.com

Toy:

Frisco Bungee Plush Squeaking Sloth. $4.86. chewy.com

Support:

EmerAid Sustain HDN (highly digestible nutrition). $15.99/100g pouch. emeraid.com

Treats:

COOKIE PAL Human Grade, Organic 10 oz. $7.99. cookiepal.com

Wellness:

Wolf Spring Vitamin Water. $35.99/12 pack. wolfspring.dog

The post New Products for Spot by Melissa L. Kauffman appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Doggone Excellent Truffles

The post Doggone Excellent Truffles by Samantha Meyers appeared initially on Dogster. Copying over whole short articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not know it, but all of these posts were appointed, contracted and spent for, so they aren’t considered public domain. Nevertheless, we value that you like the article and would enjoy it if you continued sharing simply the very first paragraph of an article, then connecting out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

While I never need a reason to make a yummy reward for my puppies, did you understand May 2 is National Truffles Day? While standard human truffles are often decked in chocolate and totally risky for pets, it does not indicate truffle deals with are off the table. This safe truffles dish for canines is simple to make, packed with healthy components and will make your canine seem like the king he is, while consuming them on the fluffiest of dog beds.

Components:

✔ 1/2 cup pumpkin puree (unsweetened); you can also use sweet potato 1/4 cup pureed banana 2 teaspoons coconut oil (melted) A spray of cinnamon or any other dog-friendly spice

  • 3/4 to 1 cup coconut flour Dried unsweetened coconut for rolling Directions: To begin making truffles for dogs, integrate pumpkin, banana and coconut oil in a bowl and mix up until integrated.
  • Add cinnamon and coconut flour to your mixture. Start with 1/2 cup of coconut flour and mix until mix is combined and not too sticky. Add more flour if required in order to roll the mix.
  • Take the dried coconut and put it into a mixer or food processor until the pieces are extremely great.
  • Scoop a small spoonful of dough and roll into balls properly sized for your dog.
  • Roll in dried coconut and place on parchment paper.
  • Cool for 20 minutes until firm. Shop in refrigerator or freezer.

Sam is a pet enthusiast, writer, baker, crafter and Instagrammer. When she’s not writing, she’s decorating cookies for her blog site SugaredAndIced.com or Instagramming her pets @FrenchHuggs_ and @Quinnstadoodle.

The post Doggone Excellent Truffles by Samantha Meyers appeared first on Dogster. Copying over whole articles infringes on copyright laws. You might not understand it, but all of these articles were designated, contracted and spent for, so they aren’t thought about public domain. Nevertheless, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the very first paragraph of a short article, then connecting out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

New research study reveals where pet dogs feel most comfy in cars and trucks


New research study exposes the areas in cars where pet dogs tend to feel the most safe and most at ease.

For pet dog moms and dads and their pooches, a car journey can either be a pleasant experience or one that they would rather not embark on. To determine which areas within vehicles pet dogs feel the most safe and settled, comparethemarket.com.au performed a study on four various dog breeds of differing sizes. Using heart rate displays, they tracked which locations of a vehicle had their tails wagging and which areas raised their heart rates one of the most.

Results revealed that the canines felt the most comfortable when their guardian remained in view, with their heart rates decreasing by -6.8% in the front seat and -9.5% in the rear seats, when compared to their typical heart rate.

In contrast, the dogs were the most uncomfortable when protected in the very back of the automobile (the “trunk” of SUVs) with their guardian’s out of sight (a 20.4% boost from their average). Behind the motorists’ seat must likewise be avoided, as this saw a 10.6% boost.

Below are the complete arise from the study:

Expert viewpoints suggests that for our furry friends, their humans are typically their primary social connection and so being separated from them for an automobile journey can be actually separating and might result in sensations of stress and anxiety. “If you are preparing a vehicle trip, do not forget to consider your dog’s security and wellness, which reaches where they are protected in your car, what kind of music you listen to and ensuring the temperature is managed,” says Stephen Zeller, General Manager of General Insurance at Compare the Market.

How music can help

If your canine tends to be uncomfortable in vehicles, research study suggests that music with either 50 or 60 beats per minute is best to keep your pooch feeling unwinded. Compare the Market has actually created a ‘Pooch Perfect Cars’ playlist on Spotify with songs such as ‘Ronan’ by Taylor Swift and ‘Hallelujah’ by Leonard Cohen to help your dog feel at ease on your next journey.

To download the playlist and to learn more professional ideas on how finest to take a trip with your family pet visit comparethemarket.com. au.

The post New research reveals where dogs feel most comfy in vehicles appeared initially on Animal Wellness Magazine.

Source

Dogs know where their paws end and the world begins

Pet dogs know where their paws end as well as the world begins, a brand-new research reveals, including our furry friends to a group of pets that, like people, recognize themselves as distinctive entities from their environment.

Called body understanding, this ability is one of one of the most fundamental symptoms of self-representation (also known as self-awareness). People establish body recognition extremely early in life: 5-month-old children can differentiate their own moving legs from a video recording of the same action, for example. This capacity then develops into more intricate types of differentiating oneself from those around them.

Previous research study primarily examined varieties on more complicated types of the capability. For example, among one of the most famous tests of self-representation is the “mirror-mark job,” in which animals are thought to have a more advanced type of self-representation, if they can identify themselves in a mirror.

Great apes, elephants, dolphins, corvid birds and also a “regularly growing list” of varieties pass this examination, stated senior writer Péter Pongrácz, an associate teacher in the division of ethology at Eötvös Loránd College in Budapest, Hungary. Yet pets had not.

Scientists lost interest in examining types that didn’t show these complicated kinds of self-representation, Pongrácz stated. However in the new research study, he and also his group chose to take a “bottom-up approach” as well as investigate whether canines reveal a lower degree of self-representation– one that would certainly be ecologically appropriate to them.

” Dogs are intelligent, large-bodied, fast-moving creatures that move in an intricate atmosphere,” Pongrácz told Live Scientific research. “Therefore, body recognition would be theoretically essential for them when discussing numerous barriers, for instance.”

To test canine body recognition, the researchers recruited 32 dogs and also carried out a “body as an obstacle” task. This test had formerly been carried out only on elephants and kids.

The pet dogs needed to pick up and offer an object to their owner while basing on a little mat; however, the things was attached to the floor covering such that the canine had to get off the floor covering in order to lift the item (and the mat). In other words, their bodies functioned as an obstacle to the task at hand, and also the pet dogs required to intentionally relocate that barrier to complete the task. The scientists made up various other aspects, such as fear-inducing conditions, that may otherwise lead the pet dog to get off the floor covering or quit on the task, Pongrácz said.

” When pets pulled on the plaything, it also started to lift the floor covering– therefore the pet dog felt that the floor covering was snagging under its paws as it was drawing the toy,” Pongrácz said. “In this scenario, the pet dogs rapidly left the mat, typically still holding the toy in their mouth; after that they gave it to the proprietor.”

The researchers found that the canines came off the mat more often and more quickly when the object was connected to the floor covering than when the object was affixed to the ground, which the researchers made use of for comparison objectives. This is “the initial evidence that canines may be capable of recognizing the link in between their own body and also the environment via the feedback impact of their own actions,” Pongrácz said. Pet dogs have actually also shown other fundamental parts of self-representation, consisting of the capability to identify their own smell, body-size recognition and episodic memory, or individual memories of details events, according to the research.

Currently, the group hopes to continue exploring self-representation in pets– as an example, by seeing whether other variables affect this capability in specific pets.

Preventing Dog Bites: How to Prevent Dog Bites in Children And What to Do if Your Dog Bites Your Kid

The post Preventing Dog Bites: How to Prevent Dog Bites in Children And What to Do if Your Dog Bites Your Kid by Christopher Dale appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

“Vector bit me!” cried my toddler, Nicholas. Unconvinced, given Nicholas’ active imagination, I rose to investigate. I found myself arbitrating between one party — my beloved son, frequently incapable of telling the truth, and another — my beloved rescue dog, inherently incapable of telling me anything. At first glance, no clues.

But for once my toddler wasn’t exaggerating. Evidenced by the pink tears streaming down his face, Vector had bit-ten him right on the cheek, fiercely enough to draw blood. Nicholas was screaming, and I was … stunned.

To say this was uncharacteristic of Vector would be an understatement akin to shrugging nonchalantly as Lassie devoured Timmy (of the 1954 Lassie TV series). At 9 years old, Vector had never displayed aggression toward people — especially not his immediate family — and his time with us predated Nicholas’ existence. Since becoming a four-legged big brother in 2016, Vector had taken the standard whacks, shoves, yanks and tumbles to which small children subject their dogs with diplomatic indifference.

Vector loved Nicholas and vice versa. So what, exactly, had happened?

Behind the bite

Separating the biter from the bitten, I took Vector to an adja-cent room, closing the door behind me. Next came Nicholas. Suspecting a toddler’s selective memory would soon distort facts with fictions, I handed him a stuffed animal. “Show me what happened,” I said. Nicholas reenacted one of his signa-ture moves: hugging Vector from behind. Though ill-advised in hindsight, it’s a scenario that had played out hundreds of times before. Why had this instance ended in bloodshed?

I went back to Vector. After a few choice words that, looking back, I’m grateful he couldn’t fully comprehend, I calmed down, turned him around and replicated Nicholas’ approach. Nothing.

I was, I knew, Vector’s favorite person. If I could get him to react to me, it would confirm my suspicion that the bite was a defensive response to pain. I tried again, this time pressing under his right haunch. Yipping, Vector nipped at the air near my hand — about as close as he’d ever get to biting me. Bingo.

The next day, a trip to the vet revealed a recently received bruise, likely accrued from high jinks during one of Vector’s infamous attempts at food thievery. Case closed, but the last thing I wanted was a repeat offense. Here’s what I’ve learned about preventing dog bite incidents around children.

Supervise, supervise, supervise

My family’s bite incident — one involving an intimately bonded dog and a child he’d lived with and loved for three-plus years — showcases the ease with which comfort can breed complacency. I was guilty of overly trusting a ram-bunctious 3-year-old and an eminently huggable pet who, despite being typically tolerant, still has the capacity to act out if startled, threatened or nursing an injury.

I should have been practicing the same precautions with Nicholas that would mitigate the likelihood of Vector biting any small child, whether mine or a perfect stranger’s. While beautiful together, young kids and dogs can create a volatile situation that demands proper oversight.

“The first thing I tell adopters is to always supervise your kids with your dog at all times,” says Samantha Gurrie, director of adoptions for Brooklyn-based The Sato Project, which rescues dogs from Puerto Rico and places them with families throughout the Eastern United States.

Of course, Samantha recognizes the near-impossibility of monitoring both our children and dogs at all times. In instances where, for example, an adult is running around the house tend­ing to chores — or, increasingly the case for many, working from home — it’s time to contain the dog away from the child. Here, pet or baby gates can be effective tools, as they generally allow the dog to still see everything and therefore not feel entirely walled off.

Teach kids dog do’s and don’ts

Samantha also emphasizes the importance of teaching small children who live with dogs how to properly interact with them.

“Don’t bother a dog when he’s sleeping, don’t grab ears or pull tails, don’t jump on top of him,” Samantha continues. “I’ve cringed seeing social media photos of kids crawling all over dogs or even riding them like horses.”

She adds that small children, lacking impulse control and the ability to comprehend that dogs may misconstrue innocent intentions, are almost always the instigator in a bite incident. Grabbing a toy or treat the dog is enjoying, bothering him during mealtime and naptime or otherwise surprising the ani­mal, all bring potential for an interspecies encounter to go astray.

According to Jill Breitner, canine body language expert and founder of California-based Shewhisperer Dog Training, 77% of dog bites happen to friends and family. For families struggling with canine-child compatibility, she recommends contacting Family Paws Parent Education, which offers safety programs.

Be aware of Body Language

Of course, bite prevention practices also must extend beyond the home. Adults with dogs must remember that kids will be … well, kids. Unpredictable, unknowing, vulnerable kids. The impetus is on grown-ups to identify signs of canine wariness that could be a harbinger of a nip, bite or other outburst.

“It’s important to know the warning signs that a dog is stressed: looking away, hiding, lip licking, panting, drooling,” Jill says.

Prevent problem situations

Situational awareness is another priority. Surprise, surprise: Family dogs home in on human food. So particular caution must be taken during gatherings involving food — especially large ones such as backyard BBQs. For cunning canines who, like Vector, are adept at food thievery, a munching kid is the easiest of marks and, should the child overreact, the encounter could entail more than a burger being bitten. Considering this, leashing (if outside) or removing your dog from the room (if inside) during food-centric gatherings is the safest way to go.

There is also one glaring outside-the-home don’t: Never tether your dog and walk away. Like humans, dogs have two options when threatened: fight or flight. Tying your pet to a pole while you run in for coffee takes away the preferred option — flight — and exponentially increases the likelihood of the other. Don’t give a small child — or anyone else — the opportunity to approach your cuddly yet captive pet, because a gentle pat on the head could become a not-so-gentle bite on the hand.

Unfortunately, no prevention method is completely fool­proof. If a dog bite does occur, Samantha and Jill agree that reprimanding the dog, which at first might seem logical, is in fact counterproductive. Per Jill, “Verbally or physically punishing dogs only adds to their fear, which in turn escalates the chance of another bite.”

With vigilance and best practices, the risk of dog bite inci­dents with small children shrinks significantly. As for my family, one bite does not a relationship ruin: Nicholas, though once bitten, is by no means shy about embracing his four-legged big brother … except now, he’s sure to approach from the front.

Read Next: How to Help Your Dog Through Big Changes


Why Gates Are GREAT!

When you can’t monitor small kids and dogs, manage the situation by using a gate. They keep children and dogs separated but allow the dogs to see what’s going on and feel part of the family.

Richell Convertible Elite 6-Panel Dog Gate. Use as a pen, freestanding gate or room divider. Includes a door panel and is available in four colors. Height is 31.5 inches. $240. Richell USA; available at petco.com
Fusion Gates. Baby and dog gates with style: Change it up with 24 art screens to choose from. Comes in various sizes, plus extensions. Starts at $179. Fusion; fusiongates.com
Etna Flower Cut-Out Design Adjustable Wooden Pet Gate. For small and medium dogs, this gate is 19 inches high. Made of wood, easy to move and fold, $79. Etna; available at chewy.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Preventing Dog Bites: How to Prevent Dog Bites in Children And What to Do if Your Dog Bites Your Kid by Christopher Dale appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.